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Social Anthropology


Directed by John Trengove

Brimming with sex and violence, The Wound is an exploration of tradition and sexuality set amid South Africa's Xhosa culture. Every year, the tribe's young men are brought to the mountains of the Eastern Cape to participate in an ancient coming-of-age ritual. Xolani, a quiet and sensitive factory worker (played by openly gay musician Nakhane Toure), is assigned to guide Kwanda, a city boy from Johannesburg sent by his father to be toughened up, through this rite of passage into manhood. As Kwanda defiantly negotiates his queer identity within this masculine environment, he quickly recognizes the nature of Xolani's relationship with fellow guide Vija. The three men commence a dangerous dance with each other and their own desires and, soon, the threat of exposure elevates the tension to breaking point.

DVD (Region 1, English, Xhosa, Color, Closed Captioned, Wiith English Subtitles) / 2017 / 88 minutes

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HUMAN is a collection of stories and images of our world, offering an immersion to the core of what it means to be human. Through these stories full of love and happiness, as well as hatred and violence, HUMAN brings us face to face with the Other, making us reflect on our lives. From stories of everyday experiences to accounts of the most unbelievable lives, these poignant encounters share a rare sincerity and underline who we are - our darker side, but also what is most noble in us, and what is universal. Our Earth is shown at its most sublime through never-before-seen aerial images accompanied by soaring music, resulting in an ode to the beauty of the world, providing a moment to draw breath and for introspection.

DVD (Region 1, Color, Closed Captioned) / 2016 / 143 minutes

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By Wang Bing

Director Wang Bing brings his careful eye to the mountainous border-region of northeastern Myanmar in Ta'ang, a powerful and revealing observational documentary that follows members of the Ta'ang minority as they flee to China to escape an ongoing and escalating civil war. In a pair of refugee camps, those displaced by the war attempt to create reasonably safe living conditions, while others go deeper into China where they may find work in sugarcane fields or try their luck in urban areas. Meanwhile, those still in Myanmar must journey across the mountains, belongings and livestock in tow, as the sounds of gunfire and artillery echo around them.

Ta'ang captures the constant insecurity, instability and disorientation that come with life as a refugee, the complexities of the choices the Ta'ang face, and the emotional toll they take.

DVD (Color, With English Subtitles) / 2016 / 147 minutes

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Directors: Sylvie Gilman, Thierry Vincent de Lestrade

For generations we have believed that man is driven by ruthless self-interest, but over the past decade this idea has been increasingly challenged. New research from fields as diverse as political science, psychology, sociology and experimental economics is forcing us to rethink human actions and motivation.

There are strong biological reasons to believe why group cooperation may beat being selfish.

But if altruism is intrinsic in man and we can all benefit from acting in a selfless manner then a society structured around altruism should be possible.

DVD (French with English subtitles) / 2015 / 90 minutes

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Directed by Steve Bradshaw

Examines whether human impact has tipped the planet into a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, with all of its political, social and behavioral implications.

A Working Group of international scientists is deciding whether to declare a new geological epoch - the Anthropocene - a planet shaped more by mankind than nature. Its members tell the story of the Anthropocene and argue whether it's a tragedy, a comedy, or something more surreal. With archival footage, award-winning stills and interviews, ANTHROPOCENE proposes a common secular narrative for mankind but leaves viewers to decide how we should write the ending. The film has the blessing of Nobel laureate Paul Crutzen, who coined the term, and is the first feature film about the Anthropocene. It is now our turn to decide--in this decade--how the Anthropocene will end.

Interviewees include Will Steffen, Erle Ellis, Jan Zalasiewicz, Andrew Revkin, John McNeil, Monica Berger Gonzalez, Eric Odada, Davor Vidas.

DVD / 2015 / (Grades 10-12, College, Adults) / 97 minutes

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Director: Daniel Karslake

Every three seconds someone in the world dies from factors related to extreme poverty - 30,000 people a day and 10.5 million a year. The sheer magnitude can be overwhelming, causing people to ask the question, "What can one person do, to possibly make a difference?"

The movie, through its portraits of five ordinary folks, will show audiences that each one of us has the potential to do great things to change the world. We hope to inspire a movement and uncover a new wave of change agents and previously untapped resources.

DVD / 2013 / 100 minutes

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Director: Werner Boote

How many people are too many? And who's one too many? Is this even the right question to ask? One thing is certain: 25 years ago there were five billion of us. Today, there are seven. Dwindling resources, mountains of toxic waste, hunger and climate change - the results of overpopulation?

In Population Boom, acclaimed director Werner Boote (Plastic Planet) traverses the globe armed with a World Bank umbrella to examine the myths and facts about overpopulation. Like a contemporary Socrates with a wry sense of humor, Boote questions the conventional wisdom. From Kenya's slums to Dhaka in Bangladesh to New York City, China, Japan and elsewhere, Boote speaks with everyone from demographic researchers to environmental activists, and comes to a surprising conclusion. It isn't overpopulation that threatens humanity's existence. Rather, it is the developed world's patterns of over-consumption and constant pursuit of immediate profit that looms over our future.

Is overpopulation a myth with the sole purpose of covering up larger and far more important problems, and making the world's population the scapegoat of a far more complex game? 'It is not about how many of us there are, but about how we treat each other,' Boote recognizes. Population Boom starts with this as the basis for a debate, and becomes a cinematic journey with the masses between myth, facts and politics.

DVD (English, German, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese and Hindi with English Subtitles) / 2013 / 90 minutes

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By Emma Christopher, Ph.D.

THEY ARE WE is the story of a remarkable reunion, 170 or so years after a family was driven apart by the ravages of the transatlantic slave trade.

In Central Cuba, proud members of the Ganga-Longoba, a small Afro-Cuban ethnic group, have kept their unique heritage alive. Incredibly, through decades of brutal enslavement, independence wars, and then the denying of all religions after the revolution, they have retained a collection of distinct songs and dances that one of their ancestors brought from Africa as a slave. Each December 17th they still perform them at the San Lazaro ceremony.

After a chance discovery while working in West Africa, director Emma Christopher spent two years showing a film of the Ganga-Longoba songs and dances to several thousand people across Sierra Leone. Eventually, in an isolated village with no road access, one man looked at another in joy and wonder as he watched a recording of the Ganga-Longoba songs and said, "THEY ARE WE!" Then the villagers joined in with others of the Ganga-Longoba songs, still recognizing them clearly despite all the years of separation.

Returning to Cuba, Emma showed her findings to the Ganga-Longoba. "We are not so alone anymore", said one of their number, woodcarver and artist Alfredo Duquesne. Later he would say that knowing where he came from "is divine."

In early 2013, after the law changed allowing them to freely leave Cuba, a trip was at last made to visit Sierra Leone. It turned into a remarkable celebration, a rare recognition of the tenacity and resolve of one young girl who once made the awful journey from Africa to Cuba, but never let her memories of home die.

THEY ARE WE tells the story of the Ganga-Longoba and of the village their ancestor called home.

It is the story of how, just very occasionally, a family separated by the slave trade can reunite for the good of all.

DVD (Color) / 2013 / 77 minutes

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By Ilja Kok and Willem Timmers

The Mursi tribe resides in the basin of the Omo River, in the east African state of Ethiopia. Mursi women are known for placing large plates in their lower lips and wearing enormous, richly decorated earrings, which has become a subject of tourist attraction in recent years.

Each year, hundreds of Western tourists come to see the unusually adorned natives; posing for camera-toting visitors has become the main source of income for the Mursi. To make more money, they embellish their "costumes" and finery to appear more exotic to the outsiders. However, by exaggerating their habits and lifestyle in such a manner they are beginning to cause their original, authentic culture to disintegrate.

Framing the Other portrays the complex relationship between tourism and indigenous communities by revealing the intimate and intriguing thoughts of a Mursi woman from Southern Ethiopia and a Dutch tourist as they prepare to meet each other. This humorous, yet simultaneously chilling film shows the destructive impact tourism has on traditional communities.

DVD (Color, English and Murs with English subtitles) / 2011 / 25 minutes

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Director: Chad Freidrichs

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home.

It began as a housing marvel. Built in 1956, Pruitt-Igoe was heralded as the model public housing project of the future, "the poor man's penthouse." Two decades later, it ended in rubble - its razing an iconic event that the architectural theorist Charles Jencks famously called the death of modernism. The footage and images of its implosion have helped to perpetuate a myth of failure, a failure that has been used to critique Modernist architecture, attack public assistance programs, and stigmatize public housing residents.

The Pruitt-Igoe Myth seeks to set the historical record straight. To examine the interests involved in Pruitt-Igoe's creation. To re-evaluate the rumors and the stigma. To implode the myth.

DVD / 2011 / 83 minutes

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By Paul Wolffram

"This is a story of the Lak people. It's also a story of how I came to know the people of the region and how my story became forever woven into their ownˇK I was to become enmeshed in events that resulted in bloodshed and death. What's more, I was held responsible."

In 2001 Paul Wolffram, a cultural researcher, travelled to one of the most isolated and unique corners of the earth. He eventually spent over two years living and working among the Lak people in the rainforest of Papua New Guinea. As his relationships with the people grew he began to glimpse a hidden reality, a dark and menacing history that loomed over his host community. Over time the sense that something is amiss grows. As his curiosity deepens Paul brings to light dark secrets that set in motion a compelling and deadly set of events.

DVD (Color) / 2011 / 89 minutes

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Director: Whitney Dow

In Haiti, there is one band that has seen it all: Septentrional. For six decades this 20 piece band has been making passionate, beautiful music - a fusion of Cuban big band and Haitian voodoo beats - through dictatorships, natural disasters, coup d'etats, and chaos, navigating the ups and downs, the glory and the tragedy that is Haiti's history.

When the Drum Is Beating interweaves the extraordinary story of Septentrional with that of Haiti: from the brutality of French colonialism and the bloody revolution that brought Haitians their freedom, to the crushing foreign debt and the 15 year American occupation that ushered in the brutal dictatorship of Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier. We see the hope that was created by Jean Bertrand Aristide, and the despair that followed after he was driven from power. And we are there as Haiti endures an earthquake that kills almost 300,000 people and tears apart the social fabric of the country.

Through its sweeping narrative, infectious music and tension-filled encounters, the film allows the viewer to see, feel and hear the passion, commitment and joy of Septentrional's musicians, and through them, the unique Haitian spirit.

DVD (English, Creole, With English subtitles) / 2011 / 84 minutes

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By Adrian Strong

Bitter Roots: The Ends of a Kalahari Myth is set in Nyae-Nyae, a region of Namibia located in southern Africa's Kalahari desert, traditional home of the Ju/'hoansi. It updates the ethnographic film record begun in the 1950s by John Marshall, whose films documented 50 years of change, and who together with Claire Ritchie, established a grass-roots development foundation, which Adrian Strong (the filmmaker) joined in the late 1980s.

Shot in 2007, two years after Marshall's death (and including footage from his films), Bitter Roots documents the return of Strong and Ritchie to Nyae-Nyae where they observe the erosion of a community-led development process following the imposition of a new agenda led by the World Wildlife Fund, which prioritizes wildlife conservation and tourism over subsistence farming. Communities voice their dissatisfaction with the new Conservancy, which has done little to help people farm and improve their lives.

Through archival footage and discussions with community members, this film sensitively examines the problems (lions, elephants, conservationists) currently facing the Ju/'hoansi and challenges the myth that they are culturally unable to farm. The film investigates the perpetuation of this myth by showing how tourists and filmmakers still demand to see how people used to live rather than they way they live now, and how the Ju/'hoansi cope with such expectations, while steadfastly continuing to farm against all the odds.

DVD (Closed Captioned) / 2010 / 71 minutes

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Directed by Nora Bateson

A daughter's loving film portrait of one of the 20th century's most influential thinkers, Gregory Bateson, anthropologist, systems theorist and ecologist.

AN ECOLOGY OF MIND is a portrait of Gregory Bateson, celebrated anthropologist, philosopher, author, naturalist, and systems theorist. His story is lovingly told by his youngest daughter, Nora, with footage from Gregory's own films shot in the 1930s with his wife Margaret Mead in Bali and New Guinea, along with photographs, filmed lectures, and interviews.

Gregory Bateson was a man who studied the interrelationships of the complex systems we live in with scientific rigor and enormous integrity. His theories, such as "the double bind" and "the pattern which connects", continue to impact the fields of anthropology, psychiatry, information science, cybernetics, urban planning, biology, and ecology, challenging people to think in new ways.

Through this film, Nora Bateson sets out to show that his ideas are not just fodder for academic theory, but can help instruct a way of life. She presents his thinking using a richly personal perspective, focusing on the stories Bateson used to present his ideas and how the beauty of life itself provided the framework of his life's pursuits.

Hoping to inspire its audience to see their lives within a larger system, glistening with symmetry, play, and metaphor, AN ECOLOGY OF MIND is an invitation to ask the kinds of questions that could help thread the world back together from the inside.

DVD / 2010 / (Grades 9-12, College, Adult) / 60 minutes

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By David MacDougall

This unforgettable documentary feature film stands in stark contrast to renowned ethnographic filmmaker David MacDougall's previous films exploring institutions for children in India.

Gandhi's Children chronicles the life of children in what the filmmaker calls "the exact opposite of Doon," a shelter for orphans and juvenile detainees run by an Indian non-governmental organization. The Prayas Children's Home for Boys is located on the northern fringe of New Delhi in Jahangirpuri, a resettlement colony whose residents were moved from inner-city slums several decades ago. It is still one of the poorest quarters of the city. The home was built in 1993, but its facilities are already deteriorating. There is broken plumbing, defective lighting, and other problems. The boys live in dormitories ranged around two central courtyards.

DVD (Color) / 2010 / 185 minutes

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Directed by James Der Derian, David Udris and Michael Udris

Examines and questions the US military's new counterinsurgency initiative, 'Human Terrain Systems', under which social scientists are embedded with combat troops.

Human Terrain is two stories in one. The first exposes a new Pentagon effort to enlist the best and the brightest in a struggle for hearts and minds. Facing long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the U.S. military initiates `Human Terrain Systems', a controversial program that seeks to make cultural awareness the centerpiece of the new counterinsurgency strategy. Designed to embed social scientists with combat troops, the program swiftly comes under attack as a misguided and unethical effort to gather intelligence and target enemies. Gaining rare access to wargames in the Mojave Desert and training exercises at Quantico and Fort Leavenworth, Human Terrain takes the viewer into the heart of the war machine and a shadowy collaboration between American academics and the military.

The other story is about a brilliant young scholar who leaves the university to join a Human Terrain team. After working as a humanitarian activist in the Western Sahara, Balkans, East Timor and elsewhere, and winning a Marshall Scholarship to study at Oxford, Michael Bhatia returns to Brown University to take up a visiting fellowship. In the course of conducting research on military cultural awareness, he is recruited by the Human Terrain program and eventually embeds with the 82nd Airborne in eastern Afghanistan. On the way to mediate an intertribal dispute, Bhatia is killed when his humvee hits a roadside bomb.

War becomes academic, academics go to war, and the personal tragically merges with the political, raising new questions about the ethics, effectiveness, and high costs of counterinsurgency.

DVD / 2010 / (Grades 10-12, College, Adult) / 84 minutes

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By Jose Padilha

The field of anthropology goes under the magnifying glass in this fiery investigation of the seminal research on Yanomamo Indians. In the 1960s and '70s, a steady stream of anthropologists filed into the Amazon Basin to observe this "virgin" society untouched by modern life. Thirty years later, the events surrounding this infiltration have become a scandalous tale of academic ethics and infighting.

The origins of violence and war and the accuracy of data gathering are hotly debated among the scholarly clan. Soon these disputes take on Heart of Darkness overtones as they descend into shadowy allegations of sexual and medical violation.

DVD (Color) / 2010 / 98 minutes

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Director: Yoav Shamir

Is anti-Semitism an immediate threat on the verge of coalescing into a second Holocaust? Or is it a scare tactic used by right-wing Zionists to discredit their critics? Speaking with the head of the Anti-Defamation League, controversial author Norman Finkelstein, and others, Yoav Shamir sets out to discover the realities of anti-Semitism today. His findings are both shocking and wryly funny.

DVD (With English Subtitles) / 2009 / 91 minutes

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Director: Stephane Pachot

Qhapaq Nan, known as the Great Inca Road, is an ancient network of roads spanning more than 8,000 miles, running through the heart of the Andes, from the ocean and deserts all the way to Machu Picchu.

Constructed hundreds of years ago during the Inca Empire, this vast transportation network still weaves its way through modern-day Peru and Ecuador. An astonishing feat of engineering, it connected Inca cities, administrative centers, agricultural and mining areas as well as ceremonial centers and sacred spaces.

More so than other remnants of the Inca civilization, the Qhapaq Nan is a symbol of a common identity that nourishes the dreams of Andean people to this day and is central to reviving their unique cultural inheritance following centuries of European domination.

Going beyond the cliches of the tourism industry, the voices of people we meet tell us about their lives, hopes and dreams. As this visually striking documentary takes us along the Great Inca Road - revealing its contours, its history, and its secrets - we witness a different image of the Andes and its people.

DVD (Spanish with English subtitles) / 2009 / 78 minutes

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By Olivia Lucia Carrescia

In Guatemala, 25 years after numerous army massacres of indigenous peasants, which left 160,000 known dead, the filmmaker of the award-winning Mayan trilogy returns to Guatemala to document the work of the Forensic Anthropology Foundation (FAF). This non-profit organization exhumes as many as 1,000 bodies a year, attempting to identify the victims and to return the remains to their families for burial.

SACRED SOIL shows the FAF team at work, recovering bodies from a mass grave, and features interviews with relatives of the deceased and Fredy Peccerelli, the Foundation's Executive Director. He describes the various aspects of their efforts, including social anthropology, or meetings with village residents, archaeology, or the physical recovery of bodies, and physical anthropology, the analysis of the remains to determine the cause of death and the identity of the victim.

Peccerelli also discusses the increasing difficulty of their work, with many eyewitnesses dying, physically difficult exhumation sites, the organization's lack of funding and a DNA lab. He also explains that, since the Foundation's work can provide evidence for criminal trials, he and other Foundation members have received death threats and must be protected by bodyguards.

Despite these difficulties and dangers, the FAF is presently working on the creation of a national database of information and DNA samples, which will prove an invaluable resource for future criminal and humanitarian investigations.

DVD (Color) / 2008 / 22 minutes

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By Alyssa Grossman

This film examines the everyday secular lives of nuns residing in the Romanian Orthodox monastery of Varatec. The majority of the 450 members of this monastery live as small groups in private houses, much like regular villagers, rather than inside the walls of the communal abbey. Throughout the year, they integrate their duties at home with their religious responsibilities to their community and to the church.

By visually exploring the social aesthetics of the monastery, the film depicts certain aspects of the nuns' everyday, lived experiences. Instead of exclusively focusing on the spiritual qualities of monastery existence, it documents the secular aspects of the nuns' relationships, activities, and routines, and offers a glimpse into the concrete ways in which they negotiate their identities within the separate yet connected spaces of home and church.

The film also incorporates brief sequences of stop-motion animation, demonstrating some of the trials and tribulations that anthropologists sometimes encounter during filming and fieldwork. Intended as a reflexive meta-commentary, these passages point to some of the unpredictable and often uncontrollable processes of ethnographic investigation.

DVD (Color) / 2006 / 28 minutes

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A street-level documentary that explores the soul of a city devastated by nearly three decades of war.

In the broken cityscape of Kabul, Afghanistan, amid the dust and rubble of war, Westerners and Afghans adjust to the uncertain possibilities of peace. Kabul Transit shuttles through the broken streets of the city, moving between public space and private, listening in on conversations, posing questions, probing the darker alleys mainstream media avoids. The result is a unique cinematic experience-a shifting mosaic of encounters and raconteurs, captured glances and telling gestures, all beautifully shot and woven together by the music and the found sounds of a city sluggishly coming to life. Rejecting the usual device of narration and portraiture, the film asks the viewer to experience Kabul as a newly arrived visitor would-with a freshness born of apprehension on finding oneself in a place that is at once hauntingly strange and altogether familiar.

DVD (Color, Closed Captioned, With English & Spanish Subtitles) / 2006 / (Grades 10-12, College, Adult) / 84 minutes

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An in-depth portrait of Edward S. Curtis, the preeminent photographer of North American Indians.

Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952) was a driven, charismatic, obsessive artist, a pioneer photographer who set out in 1900 to document traditional Indian life. He rose from obscurity to become the most famous photographer of his time, created an enormous body of work -- 10,000 recordings, 40,000 photographs, and a full length ethnographic motion picture -- and died poor and forgotten. His work was rediscovered in the 1970s and is now synonymous with photography of Indians.

Coming to Light tells the dramatic story of Curtis' life, his creation of his monumental work, and his changing views of the people he set out to document. The film also gives Indian people a voice in the discussion of Curtis' images. Hopi, Navajo, Eskimo, Blackfeet, Crow, Blood, Piegan, Suquamish, and Kwakiutl people who are descended from Curtis subjects or who are using his photographs for cultural preservation respond to the pictures, tell stories about the people in the photographs, and discuss the meaning of the images.

In 1900, Curtis attended a Piegan Sundance, a ceremony that had recently been outlawed. Curtis believed this would be the last Sundance, and it was this experience that set him on his path to document traditional Indian cultures. Eighty years later, some of Curtis' photographs inspired the Piegans to revive the ceremony, and it is still going strong today. The documentary begins with footage shot at a contemporary Piegan Sundance last year intercut with Curtis' 1900 photographs that led to its revival.

When Curtis began photographing Indians, he believed that their cultures were vanishing. When he finished in 1930, his own work vanished into obscurity, then was rediscovered in the 1970s and helped to inspire the revival of traditional culture on many reservations.

Coming to Light presents a complex, dedicated, flawed life, and explores many of the ironies inherent in Curtis's story, the often controversial nature of his romantic images, and the value of the photographs to Indian people and to all Americans today.

DVD (Color, Closed Captioned) / 2000 / (Grades 7-12, College, Adult) / 84 minutes

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Dr. Shirley Strum's new interpretation of baboon society.

Based on 26 years of fieldwork by anthropologist/primatologist Dr. Shirley Strum, BABOON TALES explores the complex world of a troop of Olive Baboons in Kenya. In sharp contrast to early theories of baboon behavior, which focused on male aggression, this program enables audiences to appreciate a society of masterful social strategists weaving a shifting web of relationships with family, friends and enemies. It may change your mind about what it means to be a baboon, and about what it means to be human.

To discover how baboons succeed in their society, BABOON TALES follows the real life adventures of five infants navigating their first year of a decade-long journey to adulthood, as the troop adapts to drought in East Africa.

DVD (Color, Closed Captioned) / 1998 / (Grades 5-12, College, Adult) / 52 minutes

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By John McKay, Kathryn Lipke Vigesaa

Guatemalan Maya women are highly skilled weavers. Their textiles, created using the backstrap loom, are known worldwide for their excellent workmanship and design. Their weaving skills have been passed down from mother to daughter since ancient times. Not only are the designs and colors of the Maya textiles attractive and unique, they also carry the history and traditions of their communities.

This illuminating documentary explores the lives of Maya women today, portrays their ancient weaving processes, and examines the economic, political, and cultural forces that are profoundly affecting the women and their weaving.

DVD (Color) / 1993 / 29 minutes

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